Slideshow: Backyard birds photographed through windows

To birders, “looking through the glass” refers to binoculars. Wildlife photographer Glen Apseloff, however, thinks of the phrase as referring to the windows of his house. Using a handheld camera without a flash or special filters, he has photographed enough birds from inside his house, through closed windows, to create two books. Some of the photographs and text in this slideshow can be found in his more recent book, Backyard Birds and More—Looking Through the Glass. All of the birds in this slideshow, like all of those in his books, were taken through closed windows from inside his home in a suburb of Columbus, Ohio.

He wrote each of the captions in the following slideshow.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse
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Tufted Titmice are found only in the eastern half of the U.S. Males and females look alike, but juveniles have a yellow eye ring instead of a black one. They nest in trees in holes created by other birds and also use artificial structures like nest boxes. Often, they line their nests with hair or fur from a variety of animals.

According to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center of the U.S. Geological Society, the oldest Tufted Titmouse was a bird banded in Virginia in 1962 that also died in Virginia. It was at least 12 years and 5 months old.

View photos of backyard birds in our galleries

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Glen Apseloff

Glen Apseloff is a medical doctor who writes medical thrillers and photographs wildlife. He has published several wildlife calendars and two books about backyard birds and one about chipmunks.

Glen Apseloff on social media