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Guidance on avoiding bird-window collisions from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Black-throated Blue Warbler September 5, 2015, by Diane Doran.
Black-throated Blue Warbler September 5, 2015, by Diane Doran.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has released a readable 16-page booklet sure to be of high interest to conservation-minded homeowners and building managers looking for ways to reduce bird-window collisions.

The new document (PDF), developed by the service’s Migratory Bird Program in partnership with researchers and industry experts, describes glass and window-design options, methods for eliminating or reducing unnecessary lighting, and effective exterior and interior landscaping options.

Intended to provide “straight-forward options,” the text outlines simple, no-cost steps that can be taken by building occupants, low-cost avoidance and minimization actions, and strategies for new buildings, renovations, and retro-fits.

According to researchers Scott R. Loss, Sara S. Loss, and Peter P. Marra of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and Tom Will of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Division of Migratory Birds, between 365 and 988 million birds are killed annually in building collisions in the U.S.

“Our results support the conclusion that building collision mortality is one of the top sources of direct anthropogenic mortality of birds in the U.S.,” they conclude. “Among other national estimates that are data-driven and systematically derived, only predation by free-ranging domestic cats is estimated to cause a greater amount of mortality.”

Download the booklet ‘Reducing Bird Collisions with Buildings and Building Glass Best Practices’ (PDF).

Study: Collisions with buildings kill 365-988 million birds annually.

Canadian and U.S. studies agree: Cats are the most lethal threat to birds.

From ABC: A list of products that really do keep birds from striking windows.

 

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