Hotspots Near You

288. Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary, Santa Fe, New Mexico

More than 200 bird species have been seen at this sanctuary just outside Santa Fe.

Randall Davey (1887-1964) was an internationally known modern art painter, printmaker, and sculptor who lived for most of his life in a former saw mill just outside Santa Fe. In 1983, the foundation that bears his name gave the house and surrounding property to the National Audubon Society. To this day, Audubon New Mexico operates it as a nature sanctuary encompassing 135 acres.

Audubon hosts educational programs, summer camps, and private events here, and the grounds are a fantastic place to bird. A lush oasis of plants greets visitors at the front garden, and blooming flowers abound just inside the entrance. Volunteer arborists plant and tend to magnificent trees in a green orchard.

On a recent visit, I watched hummingbirds at feeders, Mountain Chickadees, Steller’s Jays, and other great birds. Users of the birding website eBird have recorded more than 200 species at the sanctuary, including Pinyon Jay, Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay, Gray and Cordilleran Flycatchers, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Williamson’s Sapsucker, White-throated Swift, and Northern Goshawk. Four hummingbird species have been tallied, as well as Varied Thrush, Sage Thrasher, and Bohemian Waxwing.

It’s easy to get lost in the sanctuary’s splendor for an entire day. Don’t miss it. 

288. Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Directions

The Randall Davey Audubon Center and Sanctuary protects more than 130 acres of woodlands and riparian areas just east of Santa Fe and adjacent to Santa Fe National Forest. From the city, take Upper Canyon Rd. east for two miles to the Audubon Center’s parking lot on your right.

At a Glance

Click on the coordinates below to view location:
35°41’23.96″N 105°53’16.58″W

Habitat

Riparian areas, pinion-juniper woodlands.

Terrain

135 acres in foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Gardens wheelchair-accessible, but larger trail system is not.

Birds

More than 210 species. Mallard, Green-winged Teal, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, American Coot, Wild Turkey, Mourning and White-winged Doves, Eurasian Collared-Dove, Black-chinned, Broad-tailed, Rufous, and Calliope Hummingbirds, Spotted Sandpiper, Ladder-backed, Downy, and Hairy Woodpeckers, Williamson’s and Red-naped Sapsuckers, Northern Flicker, Red-tailed, Cooper’s, and Sharp-shinned Hawks, Ash-throated, Olive-sided, and Cordilleran Flycatchers, Say’s Phoebe, Western Wood-Pewee, Warbling and Plumbeous Vireos, Steller’s Jay, Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay, Black-billed Magpie, Clark’s Nutcracker, Common Raven, Violet-green, Barn, Tree, Cliff, and Northern Rough-winged Swallows, Black-capped and Mountain Chickadees, Juniper Titmouse, Bushtit, White-breasted, Red-breasted, and Pygmy Nuthatches, Bewick’s Wren, Townsend’s Solitaire, Curve-billed Thrasher.

When to go

Year-round. 

Amenities

Nature store, gardens, hiking trails, free maps, loaner binoculars, conservation and education programs for children. Tours of Randall Davey’s house and art studio. See website for details.

Access

Audubon center and sanctuary. Open year-round. Free admission.

Tips

Go early in the morning to spot more birds. Stay hydrated. Wear sturdy hiking boots. Call about weather conditions if planning to visit during the winter.

For more info

Randall Davey Audubon Center and Sanctuary, (505) 983-4609 
Birding trails in New Mexico
New Mexico Ornithological Society

Sites nearby

Pueblo Bonito Inn
13-minute drive from Randall Davey Audubon Center. A quiet inn with secluded grounds that are home to a variety of birds, including Evening Grosbeak.

Hyde State Park
20-minute drive from the Randall Davey Audubon Center. Attracts birds such as Mountain Chickadee, Western Tanager, and warblers.

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Daniella Cressman

Daniella Cressman is a student studying English at New Mexico Highlands University and is enrolled in the North American School of Outdoor Writing.

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