Special features

Tablet Extras for October 2016

BW1609_Cover_171x224Listed below are all the Tablet Extras that we published in our October 2016 issue.

Click the links for more information. They will open articles from BirdWatching and other online resources handpicked by the editors.

 

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Birder at Large, pages 16-18

BIRDMAN OF TEXAS
From Texas Monthly magazine, a 2011 profile of Victor Emanuel.

A CRANE’S CRY
The calls of Grey Crowned Cranes, recorded in East Africa.

SINCE 1976
The website of Victor Emanuel Nature Tours.

BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS
The blog of global Big Year record holder Noah Strycker.

GULL OF THE DECADE
An article about the Ivory Gull that visited Cape May in November 2009.

 

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My Moment with a Trogon, pages 19-21

SONGS AND CALLS
Recordings of Elegant Trogons in Arizona, Mexico, and Central America.

SIGHTINGS
From eBird, recent sightings, bar charts, and an archive of checklists from Patagonia Lake State Park.

ELEGANT VIDEO
Elegant Trogons calling in Arizona’s Huachuca Mountains.

TROGONS
Reader photos of trogons from around the world.

PATAGONIA LAKE
From Arizona State Parks, maps, rules, events, and information about Patagonia Lake State Park.

GALLERIES
Photos of birds, butterflies, and other wildlife taken by Jim Burns.

BIRD IS A VERB
An archive of the author’s biweekly column about birding.

 

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Windy City Peregrines, page 22-27

ILLINOIS PEREGRINES
The website of the Chicago Peregrine Program. Includes a Google map of falcon territories.

IN THE HAND
Josh Engel describes gathering, banding, and drawing blood from young Peregrine Falcons.

MIDWEST PEREGRINE SOCIETY
Peregrine Falcon facts, a history of the Midwest restoration project, and annual reports.

CAUGHT ON CAMERA
Video of Autumn Hope, a female Peregrine Falcon, on a skyscraper high above the Chicago River in March 2015.

WHITE AND FLUFFY
Video of Mary Hennen banding chicks at the University of Illinois at Chicago in June 2016.

MIDWEST PEREGRINE FALCONS
A collection of photos of wild Peregrine Falcons taken in 13 midwestern states and Manitoba and Ontario.

 

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40 Years and Counting, pages 28-33

HAWK ID
Tips from Pete Dunne for identifying hawks in flight.

RAPTOR BANDING
The 2015 annual report of the Cape May Raptor Banding Project.

VIEW FROM THE FIELD
Daily reports from Cape May Bird Observatory’s Hawkwatch.

RAPTOR RESOURCE
A list of publications, many of them downloadable, by raptor expert Bill Clark.

VIEW FROM THE CAPE
Recent bird sightings and nature notes from the Cape May Bird Observatory.

BIRD DROPPINGS
Our review of the latest collection of Pete’s essays.

HAWKCOUNT
The profile of the Cape May Hawkwatch maintained by Hawk Migration Association of North America.

 

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Celebrities of Staten Island, pages 34-38

IN THE NEWS
A 2015 TV news report about Bald Eagles nesting on Staten Island.

PHOTO ALBUM
Pictures of the Staten Island Bald Eagles taken by Lawrence Pugliares and other photographers.

BIRD’S-EYE VIEW
Drone video showing Staten Island’s Lemon Creek Park the way an eagle might see it.

EAGLE GALLERY
Five majestic photos of Bald Eagle.

YES, THEY SWIM
“Since You Asked” columnist Julie Craves explains how, and why, Bald Eagles swim.

RECOVERY AND DELISTING
From U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, questions and answers about the Bald Eagle’s recovery and delisting.

 

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Hotspots Near You, pages 43-47

Pollywog Pond
2.3 miles east of Hazel Bazemore on Up River Rd. Good for waterfowl, Least Bittern, White-winged Dove, and Great Kiskadee.

Hilltop Community Center
3.2 miles southeast of Hazel Bazemore on Leopard St. Native brush attracts Groove-billed Ani, Pyrrhuloxia, Olive Sparrow.

Herrick’s Cove
A peninsula at the confluence of the Williams and Connecticut Rivers, 20 miles north of Putney. Great for waterfowl and acclaimed for its landbird fallouts, including 29 warbler species.

Allen Brothers Marsh
About 11 miles north of Putney. An emergent wetland known for bitterns, rails, a variety of ducks, Marsh Wren, and Orchard Oriole.

Mountain roads that lead to the butte
On nearby foot trails, look for migrant and resident songbirds in the forest, along the forest edge, or overhead.

Mouth of Hood River
North of Bonney Butte, where the Hood River empties into the Columbia River. Ducks, waders, gulls, terns.

High Park
12.3 miles southwest of gardens on Parkside Dr. Hawk watch, run by Toronto Ornithological Club, in center of park on Hawk Hill.

Tommy Thompson Park, Hotspot Near You No. 78
9.3 miles southwest of gardens on Leslie St. More than 300 species, including shorebirds, owls, ducks, and songbirds.