Special features

Tablet Extras for April 2017

BWM1703_Cover_171x224Listed below are all the Tablet Extras that we published in our April 2017 issue.

Click the links for more information. They will open articles from BirdWatching and other online resources handpicked by the editors.

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Eye Candy, pages 16-21

TOUCANS
A collection of reader photos of colorful toucans.

BIRDS OF COSTA RICA
Our review of the second edition of Richard Garrigues and Robert Dean’s field guide.

ARACARIS
A collection of reader photos of Collared and other aracaris.

OSA PENINSULA
An article about birding in the most underbirded corner of Costa Rica.

GALLERIES
Photos of birds, butterflies, and other wildlife taken by Jim Burns.

BIRD IS A VERB
An archive of the author’s biweekly column about birding.

 

The Ultimate Bird Feeders, pages 22-27

INSPIRING BACKYARDS
How birdwatchers in five states turned their yards into sanctuaries for birds.

FIVE YARDS
How the owners of five very different properties turned their yards into rich habitats for birds.

NATIVE DATABASE
National Audubon’s new native-plants database of the best plants for birds in your area.

NATIVE-PLANT SOCIETIES
A list of native-plant societies listed by state and province by the American Horticultural Society.

WILD ONES
A national not-for-profit organization that teaches about the benefits of growing native wildflowers.

NATIVE RESOURCE
Lists of native woody and herbaceous plants recommended for the mid-Atlantic region by author Doug Tallamy.

KINGFISHER JOURNEY
Author Marina Richie’s blog about wild places, wildlife, and writing.

 

Build It and They Will Come, pages 28-33

WOODPECKER GALLERY
A collection of reader photos of Red-headed Woodpeckers.

WORK GROUP
Information about Red-Headed Woodpeckers and news about the recovery committee of the Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis.

RETURN OF THE REDHEADS
A 2005 article co-authored by biologist Rich King about the importance of snags to Red-headed Woodpeckers.

FORE!
A report on the conservation of Red-headed Woodpeckers on golf courses in the Midwest (PDF).

SAVE THAT SNAG
A Minnesota Public Radio story about the woodpeckers at the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve.

CEDAR CREEK
The website of the University of Minnesota biological field station.

SHOCK ABSORBERS
Eldon Greij explains how woodpeckers can hammer without getting headaches.

 

Before Our Eyes, pages 34-38

TAITA HILLS
BirdLife International’s profile of the Taita Hills forests.

DAY 221
Big Year birder Noah Strycker’s account of the Taita Hills.

SAVE THE APALIS
Nature Kenya’s appeal to preserve and restore habitat for Taita Apalis.

RED LIST
An account of Taita Apalis from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

COMPLEXITY
A 2015 discussion of the taxonomy of Bar-throated Apalis, Taita Thrush, and other East African species (PDF).

 

Hotspots Near You, pages 43-47, Sites nearby

Ault Park
Northwest of Armleder Park, on Observatory Ave. Warblers and other migrants in spring. In summer, gardens host hummingbirds.

The Oxbow and Shawnee Lookout, Hotspot Near You No. 44
28 miles west of Armleder, at the confluence of the Great Miami and Ohio Rivers. Numerous migrant birds; breeders include Cerulean Warbler and Peregrine Falcon.

Red Bug Slough Preserve
7.6 miles southwest of Celery Fields off S. Beneva Rd. Mesic hammock habitat. Warblers, Limpkin, Belted Kingfisher, Green Heron, and Least Tern in spring and summer.

Pinecraft Park
About five miles west of Celery Fields on Gilbert Ave. Canopy of elm and oak trees attracts thrushes, warblers, and other songbirds. Herons and ibises resident.

Bowman Reservoir
About 14 miles to the north, on SR 169. Waterbirds such as Common Loon, American White Pelican, Ring-billed and Herring Gulls. Bird from Bowman Rd. A spotting scope is useful.

Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge
Approximately 25 miles to the northwest, off Hwy. 168. Springs form a riparian area in the desert landscape. Good for desert species and migrants.

Diaz Lake County Park
1.9 miles south of the Eastern Sierra Visitor Center, on the west side of Hwy. 395. Open water, riparian areas, marsh, and pasture. More than 200 species.

Death Valley National Park
90 miles east of lake. The valleys, canyons, and woodlands of this, the hottest and driest national park, attract more than 320 species.

 

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