Manomet Inc. hosts 40th annual bird-a-thon

9/5/2018 | 0

Yellowlegs and dowitchers fly at Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge in Massachusetts. Photo courtesy Manomet Inc.

One of the first bird observatories on the East Coast will hold its 40th annual Bird-A-Thon this month. Manomet Inc., which was originally known as the Manomet Bird Observatory when it was founded in 1969, is planning the birding competition and fundraiser for September 15-16.

The event supports Manomet’s Landbird Conservation Program, which includes the Banding Lab and its research as well as all education and outreach programming. Teams can participate from all over the world.

“The format of bird-a-thon is similar to a walk-a-thon, only instead of counting miles, we’re counting bird species,” explains Chris Boudreaux, Manomet’s donor relations manager. “By participating (either by birding or sponsoring those who do), you’re helping us educate people of all ages about landbird migration and our connection to the natural world. All of the money raised goes to help purchase mist nets for our banding lab, develop nature-based education, run education programs for area students, and to collect data about migrating birds.”

Much of Manomet’s nearly 50-year history stems from connecting people to nature, from the birth of its landbird banding operation in 1969 to trips led by its scientists. Encouraging people to engage with and learn about nature has been an important pillar in how Manomet carries out its mission. “Manomet’s Bird-A-Thon is much more than just a fundraiser,” said Evan Dalton, lead instructor of Manomet’s Landbird Conservation program. “It’s a chance to spend a weekend outdoors with other people who share your interest in these amazing animals. Birds tell us so much about the world around us and Bird-A-Thon is a great time to stop and listen.”

The 40th annual Manomet Bird-A-Thon also coincides with “The Year of the Bird.” Manomet has joined with National Geographic and more than 190 other federal agencies, state and national parks, birding clubs, research institutions, conservation organizations, and media to mark the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This law has saved millions, if not billions, of birds from the effects of habitat destruction, climate change, invasive species, collisions with human-made structures, predatory cats, and pesticides.

To participate in Manomet’s Bird-A-Thon, click here.

 

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