Take part in the 2019 Global Shorebird Count

Juvenile Piping Plover. Photo by Michael Rossacci

Now that September is here, it’s time to count shorebirds! World Shorebirds Day 2019 is Friday, September 6th. 

This year’s Global Shorebird Count will take place from September 3-9, 2019. Wherever you live, you’re encouraged to participate. Shorebirds are threatened by habitat loss, human activities, and sea-level rise, so it’s important for birders to help keep tabs on them.

You can participate by counting shorebirds anyplace where shorebirds normally occur. While the birds certainly inhabit shores and beaches, they can also be found at inland freshwaters and grasslands or even semi-deserts as well. Count shorebirds at as many different locations as possible. The organizers only need one set of complete checklist per site; you decide which one to share with them.

Using eBird

Participants must use eBird to share counting results of the Global Shorebird Counts. “eBird has proved many times it’s incredible contribution to bird conservation and our efforts have been a tremendous help for the eBird team to better understand bird migration and population changes,” writes Gyorgy Szimuly, the head of World Shorebirds Day.

If you’re new to eBird, register here. And if you need more info, here’s why you should eBird.

The most convenient way to record bird sightings is using your mobile phone in the field. The eBird mobile app keeps all your records and lets them share with World Shorebirds Day on the go. Read more about the app here.

View dozens of bird-migration maps from eBird

Sharing checklists

Checklist sharing is simple but if you need guidance, eBird has the perfect tutorial how to do it. Please use the eBird username worldshorebirdsday (without spaces) to share checklists. You can already share checklists in the field from the eBird mobile app. Just add World Shorebirds Day to your contacts.

Banded birds

Be sure to be on the lookout for banded birds! Especially Piping Plovers, Red Knots, Semipalmated Sandpipers, Ruddy Turnstones, and Sanderlings. You may report your sightings to BandedBirds.org and the USGS Bird Banding Lab, which oversee all banding in the United States.

BirdWatching is proud to be a supporter of World Shorebirds Day and the Global Shorebird Count.

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