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Black-capped Kingfisher

Posted by Gautam Chakrabarti on September 9, 2013 at 10:37 pm
Viewed 191 times

Close up of a Black-capped Kingfisher – Snapped from our motor boat at Dr. Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary, Goa, India.

Camera Canon EOS 7D
Lens Model EF70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
Exposure 0.004 sec (1/250)
Aperture f/5.6
Focal Length 300 mm
ISO Speed 2500
Exposure Bias -1/3 EV

The Black-capped Kingfisher (Halcyon pileata) is a tree kingfisher which is widely distributed in tropical Asia from India east to China, Korea and Southeast Asia. This most northerly of the Halcyonidae is resident over much of its range, but northern populations are migratory and the wintering range extends to Sri Lanka, Thailand, Borneo and Java.
This is a large kingfisher, 28 cm in length. The adult has a purple-blue back, black head and shoulders, white neck collar and throat, and rufous underparts. The large bill and legs are bright red. In flight, large white patches are visible on the blue and black wings. Sexes are similar, but juveniles are a duller version of the adult. The call of this kingfisher is a cackling ki-ki-ki-ki-ki.
This is a common species on coastal waters especially in mangroves. Although easily disturbed, it perches conspicuously on wires or other exposed perches. This species mainly hunts large insects, but coastal birds will also take fish and frogs. The flight of the Black-capped Kingfisher is rapid and direct, the short rounded wings whirring.
The nest is a tunnel in an earth bank. A single clutch of 4-5 round white eggs is typical.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-capped_Kingfisher

Kingfishers are a group of small to medium sized brightly coloured birds in the order Coraciiformes. They have a cosmopolitan distribution, with most species being found in the Old World and Australasia. The group is treated either as a single family, Alcedinidae, or as a suborder Alcedines containing three families, Alcedinidae (river kingfishers), Halcyonidae (tree kingfishers), and Cerylidae (water kingfishers). There are roughly 90 species of kingfisher. All have large heads, long, sharp, pointed bills, short legs, and stubby tails. Most species have bright plumage with little differences between the sexes. Most species are tropical in distribution, and a slight majority are found only in forests. They consume a wide range of prey as well as fish, usually caught by swooping down from a perch. Like other members of their order they nest in cavities, usually tunnels dug into the natural or artificial banks in the ground. A few species, principally insular forms, are threatened with extinction.
Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingfisher
The Dr. Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary is a bird sanctuary located on western tip of the Island of Chorao along the river Mandovi, Goa, in India. The sanctuary is named after Dr. Salim Ali, the eminent Indian ornithologist. Away from the beaches of Goa this is truly a paradise for nature lovers and bird watchers where you can see a variety of species of birds and plants.
From Panaji, one can take a cab, auto or bus till the Ribandar ferry dock and take a ferry across the Mandovi River to the island. The Sanctuary is located very close to the ferry dock and identified with a signboard.
The size of the sanctuary is 178 ha (440 acres). The area is covered with a thick layer of mangrove forest. The place is not well maintained but it is habitat with rich species of birds.
One can find many different kinds of birds and animals, including species such as the mudskipper and the black drongo.
Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salim_Ali_Bird_Sanctuary